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20130218
20130218
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Search Results 0 to 19 of about 20 (some duplicates have been removed)
(instrumental music) >> for 63 years the u.s. has been part of the nato alliance, but is nato still an important safeguard for americans or is it simply a money pit? >> the nato relationship is enormously important to us. i think it was winston churchill said something to the affect that the only worst thing than, than going to war with allies is to go to war without allies. >> we're dealing with network global threats and if we don't provide a network global response we're always gonna to be on the back foot. >> what we need is not just nato on the conventional defense side, we need a nato alliance for economic statecraft. >> the problem is that it is an alliance that is largely sustained by american defense spending. (instrumental music) >> in a democracy, agreement is not essential, but participation is. >> never before in our history have we been so interconnected with the rest of the world. >> foreign policy is actually not foreign. >> america has faced great hardship before and each time we have risen to the challenge. >> the ultimate test is to move our society f
attempts to prohibit the use of coffee and coca in the u.s. and around the world. mr. cortes describes secret deals made by top u.s. anti-drug official harry answer linger pushing to banco ca's use worldwide. this is a little over an hour. >> okay. um, and so tonight we are pleased to welcome ricardo cortes to discuss his latest book, "a secret history of coffee, coe that and cola: a tale of coffee, coca-cola, caffeine, secret formulas, special flavors, special favors and a future of prohibition." cortes is the creator and illustrator of a series of subversive books for all ages, for postally all ages about such things as marijuana, bombing and the jamaican bobsled team. his latest book examines a series of highly addictive substances that have caused many deaths and fueled much, much profit in this how they make their way into the u.s. and what the u.s. government's role has been in insuring that they come into this country, all right? and this evening we are pleased to be joined by two drug policy experts as well. its fellow sanho tree and colette that youngers. and without further a
. they represent 15 countries, including japan, the u.s., south korea, china, and australia. the director of the college's research department says he hopes they can discuss each nation's participants and a way to building a regional security framework. he also commented on china's presence at the event. >> translator: china's participation has great significance, considering the timing of the meeting. >> relations have soured over a territorial dispute. china denies the clang. >>> experts with japan's nuclear regulator have thrown another wrench into plans to put power plants back online. officials have been looking at six complexes to see if they're stable. they found the one near the village of higashidori may be sitting on active faults. we have the report. >> reporter: the regulators dug into the ground. they found volcanic ash. they concluded that something under foot was not stable. they say two faults could be active. the plant's operators have a different view. they say cracks around the foot were caused by ground water. the experts say there's little evidence to support that vie
be a felony to use stem cells in an unapproved therapy or to sell them for export to the u.s. that's why we were surprised to see this on many websites: a shoppingart. we clicked on eckluns stem tech labs cart, and, with no medical or scientific credentials, we bought 20 million umbilical cord stem lls for $5,000, shipped to america. we had the cells sent by the highest medical standard. duke university suggested we use something called a dry shipper, cooled with liquid nitrogen. we sent the dry shipper to stem tech. stem tech sent the frozen cells to us. and we forwarded them to joanne kurtzberg. a computer chip inside our package verified that the cells were properly frozen all the way. dr. kurtzberg analyzed the cells. for comparison, look under the microscope. healthy umbilical cord stem cells look like this. the cells we got from stem tech had disintegrated. >> so these are the cells you purchased. and they are dying or dead. >> we see all of these dead and disintegrating cells and, essentially, cellular debris. >> mm-hmm. >> are there dangers of injecting that into someone? >> there a
street or for the u.s. a main street brand. but they have this great digital fashion thing going on. it's a gimmicky partnership with google. you see these reports about google getting the lines between fashion and retail and tech are all blurring. >> they are, indeed. so on today's show, there's a -- here is another taster. in china, it's the first trading day market in the new year of the snake. so will it be new year old problems? up next from hong kong, we'll have the latest analysis. >> did you just slither? also, the final week of campaigning in italy ahead of the general elections. we will be live in milan throughout the morning for a roundup of the candidates policies and pit falls. julia will join us for that. >>> and hear state from the finance ministers. we have a roundup of the g-20 meeting in moscow. >> and london fashion week is under way and international expansion seems to be the latest trend. we'll hear from top designers who are putting their foot forward on the global runway. >>> first, standard & poors says it wants more time to gauge shinzo abe's rating policies. s&
to make this country mad? canada has made it clear that it could retaliate against the u.s. do we need to be worried about this? >> that is a great question. they are part of nafta. most of americans do not realize that our number one trading partner is not china, it is canada. i just really do not understand the rationale of not building this. it was the first reason that president obama gave. now, i see no reason, other than kowtowing to the very radical environmentalists and not bringing this to america. dagen: thank you very much. steve moore from the "wall street journal." thanks again. >> thank you, dagen. dagen: let's take a look at the u.s. dollar. trading down versus other major currencies today. agreeing not to target the exchange rates of world currencies. concerns that competitive devaluation could spark a currency war. let's just say, g20 kind of poo-poo'd this. are we not the biggest culprit through the federal reserve of weakening the dollar? >> well, with the federal reserve, their quantitative easing program has been having side effects. i think it is important to reco
the fire on the carnival cruise ship triumph. yesterday, the u.s. coast guard said the fire started in front of a generator in the main engine crime. that fire left the cruise liner without power for five days with 4200 people on board. investigators say it could take up to a year to determine what exactly caused the fire. despite that initial report from the coast guard, congress says it still wants answers into the cruise ship disaster. hours after the triumph was towed to alabama, senator jay rockefeller september a letter to the -- sent a letter to the coast guard, demanding a review of the incident and similar incidents in the last six years. the senator says there might be a larger safety issue that needs to be reviewed involving large passenger vehicles. >>> and when congress returns next week, they will only have four days for the sequester. coming up, the automatic budget cuts here for california. >>> why facebook's tax bill is zero. in fact, the social media giant will get a huge refund. >>> and what russian scientists are finding after friday's meteor explosion and the ne
day is what matters sales and auto sales. the u.s. holiday resulted in low trading volume. the market reacting. risks to the euro zone's recovery. speaking of europe, by the way, is the u.s. going the way of greece? check out the front cover of the latest addition. "we follow president obama's plan, the u.s. will be in worse shape than greece is today." it will take 25 years, maybe sooner. the federal debt is the problem. we have to make serious spending cuts now. we could be like greece. interesting. and frightening. tracy: nobody is cutting anything any time soon. what do they drink in greece? ashley: -- tracy: okay. get that out. revealing illegal immigrants would be allowed to come and become legal permanent residents. marco rubio had this to say. >> it would be dead on arrival in congress, leaving us with unsecured orders and a broken legal immigration system for years to come. no surprise. lou dobbs is here and has something to say about this. lou: i am not riled up, by the way, at all. this is entirely to be expected. the bipartisan plan, which they almost have complete. they h
the world, to cheap cigars -- which the u.s. military tried to get away with giving him -- to arguments from his generals and to diet warnings and suggestions from his wife. these were largely ignored, especially the one that involved his eating only tomatoes. as i dug into all these materials, it became clear to me that for someone with churchill's great conversational skill and his ability to create a congenial setting, meals had an advantage over most kinds of meetings. they could be as long as he liked, and in the case of dinners, they could run into the wee hours when churchill gathered strength and others tired. his daughter, mary, reports that luncheon and dinner conversations often became so extended that meal times tended to prolong themselves far into the afternoon or evening with luncheons lasting sometimes until half past three. a typical evening, let's say, at checkers which is the prime minister's country house would begin at 8:30 with champagne in the drawing room. dinner would last from 9 to 10, 10:30, then cigars after the ladies were excused. when the men had rejoined the l
states serving life sentences for first-time truck offenses -- drug offenses. life sentences. the u.s. supreme court upheld life sentences for first-time drug offenders against an eighth amendment challenge that such sentences were cruel and unusual in violation of the eighth amendment, and the u.s. supreme court said, no, no, it's not cruel and unusual punishment to sentence a young man to life in imprisonment for a first-time drug offense even though virtually no other country in the world because such a thing. so we've got to end this idea that the criminals are them, not us. and instead say there but for the grace of god go i. all of us have made mistakes in our lives, taken wrong turns. but only some of us have been required to pay for those mistakes for the rest of our lives. in fact, president barack obama himself has admitted to more than a little bit of drug use in his lifetime. he's admitted to using marijuana and cocaine in his youth. and if he hadn't been raised by white grand parents in hawaii, if he hadn't done much of his illegal drug use on predominantly white college
the threat posed by guerrillas. the fact that the u.s. army and marine corps and other modern militaries including the french have to deal with the threat today is absolutely unsurprising. but i don't mean to suggest that absolutely nothing has changed over the course of the last 5,000 years. there have, in fact, been some significant changes. the biggest one has to do with the power of public opinion and propaganda. and this was something that was demonstrated in our very own war of independence. now, when we think of the american war of independence, we tend of think of battles like lexington and concord where the yankees slithered on their bellies and shot at the redcoats from behind trees and rocks in ways that the redcoats assumed to be ungentlemanly. now, these were, no doubt, effective tactics. but in the end what's striking to me about studying the american revolution is the extent to which it was decided not so much by what happened on the battlefield, but what actually happened in the house of parliament, in the commons in england. now, when you read conventional accounts, if i
billion u.s., ten trillion yen, 2.2% of gdp. a lot of that would go to infrastructure, a lot to the north to the earthquake area, but, of course, we've seen 14 such packages since the late 1990s. and this one has to be different. and also he's pressing the bank of japan. last time i was here was to introduce governor shirakawa several years ago who i think is a very good governor of one of the major central banks in the world, pressing him to put in more monetary stimulus which i think is necessary. but i, one of the points that was made right in this room several years ago by governor shirakawa, and i've been with him three times in the last two months, is, you know, monetary and fiscal stimulus aren't enough n. the case of japan, you need major deregulation. i think major structural reforms, deregulation in the service area. so, hopefully, that'll all flow into the package of the new prime minister. certainly, a tough job -- it's a tough job, but this is the world's third largest economy, and if we don't get japan moving with some of the other problems with europe, etc., i think the wor
this year. the german market also takes a step forward, but u.s. markets are closed because of a holiday. draghi and others in focus of the economy recovering. the german recovery in a modest pace. >> the dax finished up by nearly .5%. eurostoxx 50 up just a bit. the euro trading slightly higher, $1.3350. venezuelan president hugo chavez has made a surprising return of from cuba where he had another surgery for cancer and treatment. but she had not been seen since undergoing a fourth operation last december. his supporters turned out in numbers to welcome him back home. >> celebration on the streets of caracas. they're coming out to show their joy of the president's return. >> welcome back to venezuela. >> we love you. there is an entire population and that will support new always. >> it to the speculation to rest, he released these pictures showing him with his daughters. he appears alert and in good spirits. they broadcast messages from members of the government will commingle leader back. he told them that the president was in good condition but would be continuing his cancer treatmen
. >> the japanese yen has continued its slide against the u.s. dollar today. they were not following a lack of restraint against the japanese authorities. it was thought the central bankers meeting over the weekend were calling for governments to stop taking action to weaken their currencies, but the final communique out of japan is criticism over the recent weakness. let's have a quick look to see how european markets are fairing. as we can see, a mixture across the board. being led lower by weaker mining stocks, all of it being affected by the equities there being closed for presidents day. that is all for me. i will be back with a bit more. >> thank you very much. the latest headlines from bbc news, david cameron promises to make it easier for indian students to trade and study in the uk as he kicks off his tour of mumbai. hugo chavez from -- announcing his return to the country after cancer surgery. the bbc has apologized for any disruption that has been caused to the broadcast today as some members of the national union of journalists have walked out in protest against compulsory redun
. the argentinian -- the former u.s. open champion going one better than his performance last year. cricket and south africa have beaten pakistan by four wickets. he took nine wickets in a match. losing their last six wickets for 22 runs with south africa, then chasing down a victory target of 182 to win the match. the home side claimed victory by four wickets. australia has won their sixth winning the cricket world cup. in the final in mumbai. 259-7. perry also played football for australia. he took three wickets. it is the first time australia has held the world cup and ashes titles. these next pictures might come to a surprise for anyone who saw mike tyson bite a chunk out of a vendor hollifield's year during their fight back in 1997. he surprised his former enemy at a promotional event in chicago. they are good friends now. he will like tyson even more if his appearance helps sell his new brand of barbecue sauce. that is all your sport for now. more later. >> thanks very much. finally, the british prime minister david cameron is hoping to help top a new poll, the british music charts. i
that the government of the u.s. is never going to find you, you're just going to be one of a million different trades and you are hidden from public view, that is really not the case. the sec has done it often and done it well. liz: we will be watching this alongside you. the state of oklahoma is challenging the constitutionality of dodd-frank. oklahoma attorney general tells us why he thinks part of the act puts taxpayers at risk. david: the attack tha tax that e passed on you courtesy of the health care law. liz macdonald is here to explain coming up. [ male announcer ] i've seen incredib things. otherworldly things. but there are some things i've never seen before. this ge jet engine can understand 5,000 data samples per second. which is good for business. because planes use less fuel, spend less time on the ground and more time in the air. suddenly, faraway places don't seem so...far away. ♪ adam: i'm adam shapiro with your fox business brief. an apology to the twitter followers after the burger king twitter account was hacked. the site was rebranded as mcdonald's. burger king said it is workin
as well. neil, the reason? people are saying because refine riz are down. the u.s. says our oil reserves are up. the fact is they're saying there's more necessity for gas around the globe, and that causes prices to spike, and here in california, as you hear a bus backing up to my right, people are not too happy whatsoever at all. they drive in and out of the station we're at. 4.99. you can drive around southern california in the car culture and fine a number of stations already above $5 a gallon. and again, we're in the middle of winter. wait until april comes around and the summer driving season starts and the prices spike then. people are worried we might see $6 a gallon here in california. i. >> neil: adam, thank you very much. even before the cold, it would cost you more to fill your car. wait until you see how much more it could be costing you just to heat your home. phil is on the -- with the latest on the chill pill. reporter: in the northeast if you're heating with heating oil, prices are 91-cents a gallon more than a year ago, this is mainly because of the aftermath of hurrican
Search Results 0 to 19 of about 20 (some duplicates have been removed)

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